The National Interest (Online), August 4, 2015

–By Ying Ma

Inside a modern lecture hall at The George Washington University (GW), a well-respected guest lecturer from China addressed me and the other women in his audience as “female comrades.”

I nearly spat out my tea.

It was a lazy April Saturday afternoon in Washington, DC. I had come to GW to attend a symposium sponsored by the university’s Confucius Institute, a Chinese language and cultural center. Meant to be a vehicle for exporting China’s soft power, Confucius Institutes—funded by Beijing and numbering over four hundred—have sprung up around the world during the past decade.

To read this piece in its entirety, please click HERE.

NationalInterest.org, June 17, 2015

–By Ying Ma

China’s large-scale construction of artificial islands in the hotly disputed waters of the South China Sea has led many in Washington to call for a tougher stance against Beijing. While China no doubt bears much responsibility for pursuing murky and ambitious territorial claims with aggressive actions, contending with China’s rise also requires a lot more than just getting tough.

During the course of the Obama administration, Beijing has reacted negatively not just to the administration’s gestures of goodwill but also to its more confrontational actions and rhetoric. A look back at the missteps early in the Obama administration would offer a useful guide to prescribing future action. The China Challenge: Shaping the Choices of a Rising Power, a new book by noted China scholar Thomas Christensen, provides precisely such a guide.

To read the entire piece, please click HERE

WSJ.com, April 27, 2015

–Column by Ying Ma

During Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to Washington, D.C. this week to discuss trade and security issues and address a joint session of Congress, his penchant for whitewashing his country’s World War II history will be closely scrutinized.

Already, a bipartisan group of Congressmen have called on Mr. Abe to “squarely face history.” In a letter last week to Japanese Ambassador to the United States Kenichiro Sasae, 25 members of the House of Representatives urged the Japanese leader to use his upcoming visit to “formally reaffirm and validate” past apologies issued by Japan for its wartime aggression.

However, many others in Congress are either unfamiliar with Japan’s historical amnesia or happy to gloss over it themselves. Those who care about the U.S.’s moral leadership and interests in Asia should urge Mr. Abe to get right with history.

To read the entire column, please click HERE. 

Heritage Foundation, March 20, 2015

Ying Ma addressed the Conservative Women’s Network in a speech titled “Prevailing Over the Welfare State.”  She shared her personal story of prevailing over the poverty, lawlessness and general dysfunction of inner-city Oakland, California. She drew distinct contrasts between the “welfare state” approach to addressing poverty versus an approach based on hard work, individual responsibility and educational achievement.

In the speech, Ms. Ma also said “No, thank you” to “bossy liberal women” who reguarly claim to speak for all women.

The Conservative Women’s Network is made up of over 1,000 women in the Washington, DC, area who are policy analysts, stay-at-home mothers, students, organization presidents and more. Its monthly luncheons take place at the Heritage Foundation and are co-hosted by the Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute.

To view the speech, please use the YouTube player below.

[Correction: At approximately 8:14 in the video, Ms. Ma said, “The Oakland of my childhood had a whole lot of economic equality and fairness to go around.” She meant to say the China of her childhood.]

Men Who Don’t Pay

PJ Media, March 23, 2015

–Opinion by Ying Ma

We live in a society where lots of men do not pay. Not only do they fail to pay for the women with whom they go on a date, they increasingly do not even pay for themselves.

The men afflicted with this syndrome tend to be young, and are usually under the age of forty. Those who suffer most severely tend to be products of the nation’s top universities or respectable urban workplaces—where political correctness and leftwing ideology regularly trample over concepts such as chivalry and honor. At these institutions, the worst thing that could happen is to be perceived as racist, sexist or homophobic. Being a weasel that does not pay is not considered a source of embarrassment.

The occurrences of such male wussiness in modern society are too numerous to detail, but just a few examples can shed light on the nature and extent of this trend.

[To read the rest of this piece, please click HERE.]

WSJ.com, March 19, 2015

–Commentary by Ying Ma

In the past week, the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Italy have all announced plans to join the new China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). European participation in the new financial institution has materialized despite strong objections from the Obama administration, which sees the AIIB as China’s vehicle for creating a rival to the U.S.-led World Bank.

Is the AIIB merely a thinly veiled Chinese attack on the international financial architecture created by the United States and its allies after World War II? What does European enthusiasm for the AIIB signify for the global strategic competition shaping up between the U.S. and China?

Robert Zoellick, former president of the World Bank and former U.S. Trade Representative and Deputy Secretary of State under George W. Bush, says there is certainly a risk that the new bank could end up being a vehicle for Chinese influence but also calls the Obama administration’s approach “mistaken both on policy and on execution.”

To read the entire column, please click HERE

WSJ.com, March 13, 2015

–Commentary by Ying Ma

China announced a robust 10.1% increase to its military budget at the opening of the country’s annual legislative session in Beijing last week, signaling that it has no intention of reversing efforts to better defend its interests in the Pacific. Meanwhile, at another major political meeting near Washington D.C. – last month’s Conservative Political Action Conference – Republican presidential hopefuls barely mentioned China or Asia at all.

Are GOP candidates for the 2016 presidential race going to make the mistake of ignoring China’s importance as a foreign policy challenge for the U.S.?

Hardly. In fact, the 2016 U.S. presidential race on the Republican side is shaping up to be one where the major candidates are likely to bring real policy gravitas, not just caricatures and jingoism, to discussions about U.S. policy toward China and Asia.

To read entire column, please click HERE.


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