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Heritage Foundation, March 20, 2015

Ying Ma addressed the Conservative Women’s Network in a speech titled “Prevailing Over the Welfare State.”  She shared her personal story, as recounted in the memoir Chinese Girl in the Ghetto, of prevailing over the poverty, lawlessness and general dysfunction of inner-city Oakland, California. She drew distinct contrasts between the “welfare state” approach to addressing poverty versus an approach based on hard work, individual responsibility and educational achievement.

In the speech, Ms. Ma also said “No, thank you” to “bossy liberal women” who reguarly claim to speak for all women.

The Conservative Women’s Network is made up of over 1,000 women in the Washington, DC, area who are policy analysts, stay-at-home mothers, students, organization presidents and more. Its monthly luncheons take place at the Heritage Foundation and are co-hosted by the Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute.

To view the speech, please use the YouTube player below.

[Correction: At approximately 8:14 in the video, Ms. Ma said, “The Oakland of my childhood had a whole lot of economic equality and fairness to go around.” She meant to say the China of her childhood.]

Men Who Don’t Pay

PJ Media, March 23, 2015

We live in a society where lots of men do not pay. Not only do they fail to pay for the women with whom they go on a date, they increasingly do not even pay for themselves.

The men afflicted with this syndrome tend to be young, and are usually under the age of forty. Those who suffer most severely tend to be products of the nation’s top universities or respectable urban workplaces—where political correctness and leftwing ideology regularly trample over concepts such as chivalry and honor. At these institutions, the worst thing that could happen is to be perceived as racist, sexist or homophobic. Being a weasel that does not pay is not considered a source of embarrassment.

The occurrences of such male wussiness in modern society are too numerous to detail, but just a few examples can shed light on the nature and extent of this trend.

[To read the rest of this piece, please click HERE.]

WSJ.com, March 19, 2015

–Commentary by Ying Ma

In the past week, the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Italy have all announced plans to join the new China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). European participation in the new financial institution has materialized despite strong objections from the Obama administration, which sees the AIIB as China’s vehicle for creating a rival to the U.S.-led World Bank.

Is the AIIB merely a thinly veiled Chinese attack on the international financial architecture created by the United States and its allies after World War II? What does European enthusiasm for the AIIB signify for the global strategic competition shaping up between the U.S. and China?

Robert Zoellick, former president of the World Bank and former U.S. Trade Representative and Deputy Secretary of State under George W. Bush, says there is certainly a risk that the new bank could end up being a vehicle for Chinese influence but also calls the Obama administration’s approach “mistaken both on policy and on execution.”

To read the entire column, please click HERE

WSJ.com, March 13, 2014

–Commentary by Ying Ma

China announced a robust 10.1% increase to its military budget at the opening of the country’s annual legislative session in Beijing last week, signaling that it has no intention of reversing efforts to better defend its interests in the Pacific. Meanwhile, at another major political meeting near Washington D.C. – last month’s Conservative Political Action Conference – Republican presidential hopefuls barely mentioned China or Asia at all.

Are GOP candidates for the 2016 presidential race going to make the mistake of ignoring China’s importance as a foreign policy challenge for the U.S.?

Hardly. In fact, the 2016 U.S. presidential race on the Republican side is shaping up to be one where the major candidates are likely to bring real policy gravitas, not just caricatures and jingoism, to discussions about U.S. policy toward China and Asia.

To read entire column, please click HERE.

Wall Street Journal Asia, December 8, 2014

–Op-Ed by Ying Ma

Chinese President Xi Jinping ’s anticorruption campaign garnered splashy headlines over the weekend when authorities arrested Zhou Yongkang, China’s former chief of domestic security. But while observers expound on the significance of this latest development in Beijing’s power struggle, another case deserves attention as well—that of journalist Shen Hao.

Locked up for nearly two months before Mr. Zhou’s formal arrest, Mr. Shen is one of China’s finest contemporary writers. He has been charged with extortion, embezzlement and other crimes and has repeatedly confessed to his wrongdoing on state television. Yet confessions do not a guilty man make. In fact, this case provides a poignant reminder that the rights of the accused deserve far better protection under the Chinese legal system.

[Click HERE to read the entire article on WSJ.com.]

WSJ.com, November 7, 2014

–Commentary by Ying Ma

As U.S. President Barack Obama gets ready to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping following the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing next week, relations between the world’s two largest economies are mired in a troubling inertia.

On issues ranging from heated territorial disputes with neighbors to harassment of the U.S. military in international air space, China shows no interest in backing down from challenging the U.S.-led order in Asia. The solution, many in Washington argue, is to strengthen U.S. resolve and capacity against Beijing, but it seems prudent to also ask: Has the Obama administration sent the proper reassurances to China that responsible behavior would be welcomed?

(To read the entire article, please click HERE.)

WSJ.com, September 23, 2014

–Commentary by Ying Ma

U.S. National Security Advisor Susan Rice visited China earlier this month to pave the way for President Barack Obama’s upcoming meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping after an Asia-Pacific trade summit in Beijing this November. Rice’s visit produced no breakthroughs, and each side walked away having voiced their gripes against the other.

In many ways, Rice’s visit was indicative of a Sino-American relationship that is currently fraught with tension. Prior to Obama’s November visit, his administration should do some serious soul searching about its China policy.

In the face of a rising and more assertive China, many in Washington have argued that the United States must demonstrate firmer resolve to force China to back down from challenging the U.S.-led security order in Asia. These recommendations are dangerous, argues Hugh White, professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University, because China is serious about challenging U.S. primacy in Asia and has no interest in backing down.

[To read the rest of the article, please click HERE.]

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